Archive for the ‘apparel’ Category

The Trench: Joe Rocket’s latest all-climate offering

February 1, 2011

Our man Steve Blakeney over at Sullivans Inc., just sent us the latest offering from Joe Rocket and upon first glance, it looks pretty cool (or warm).

The Joe Rocket Trench is a combo bit of kit that features a mesh, armored jacket surrounded by a trench coat-length waterproof outer layer. The inner jacket also sports a removable fleece vest. Oh, and there is a rain pant included that’s stored in a pocket on the outer layer. When combined together, the three pieces look like an all-climate riding solution.

Here’s some of the details from Sullivans:

Trench coat (outer layer) features:

  • 100 percent waterproof
  • Waterproof pockets
  • Reflective stripes and logos
  • Adjustable cuffs
  • Built-in straps that ca be used to secure jacket to legs
  • Built-in storage straps for rolling up and affixing jacket to motorcycle
  • Rain pan included and stored in integrated pocket.

Mesh jacket (inner layer) features:

  • Grade A C.E.-rated protectors in shoulders and elbows
  • Removable spine pad with pocket for optional C.E. spine protector
  • Removable warm fleece vest
  • Multi-point SureFit custom adjustment system
  • Internal face shield pocket
  • Snap Loops for attaching jacket to belt
  • Reflective stripes and logos
  • Available in sizes small through 3XL.
  • MSRP is $249.99

Joe Rocket Dry Tech Nano gear long-term test: A year of of all-weather riding

January 19, 2011

by Trevor Trumbo, former Advanstar group marketing director, Powersports and Veterinary divisions

It’s difficult to find good riding gear that you can live with day in and day out all year long. But this 2010 offering from Joe Rocket may be the only set of gear you need to buy. I’ve been wearing the Dry Tech Nano jacket and pants for more than a year, and I have put both pieces to the test. Consider this background on my riding:

A motorcycle is my only mode of transportation in California. I commute to work five days a week on my motorcycle. The total round trip distance is 54 miles. I take day/overnight trips around California every weekend on the motorcycle and consistently log 300-plus miles. Each week I ride between 500 and 800 miles.

The jacket and pants have held up to harsh commuting conditions consisting of highway riding at 70-plus mph through heat, cold, and rain. I’ve had other jackets and pants that show fraying edges after a few months of riding. The Joe Rocket set looks almost new (except for the dirt and grime, see pic below) and I can confidently report that the stitching and seams remain in excellent condition. Both jacket and pants have multiple highly reflective panels that do a great job of making sure you’re seen when riding at night or in low-light conditions.

The jacket and pants provide plenty of ventilation during the summer, when many riders either wear a mesh jacket or don’t wear a jacket at all. The Dry Tech Nano jacket flows enough air to keep you cool in all conditions, except 100-plus degrees and sitting still. I wear the jacket all 12 months of the year. When the weather begins to cool down, you can zip in the removable liner and be comfortable down to about 20 degrees (that’s the coldest temperature I’ve ridden in). Colder than that and you’ll want heated gear anyway. The pants feature a removable liner that you only need in the coldest of conditions.

I was most impressed with the ability of the jacket and pants to keep me warm and dry, even in torrential downpours. I can tell you that I don’t miss pulling over on the side of the road and trying to change into rain gear at the first sign of a storm and then having to change out again. The Joe Rocket gear lets me keep on riding without worrying about the weather. The pants feature full-length waterproof zippers up the legs making them easy to get into and out of. The Nano web material used, according to Joe Rocket, was originally developed as an air filtration system. No matter, it certainly works as advertised and is 100 percent waterproof and dries very quickly.

The jacket is adjustable for a variety of rider sizes with elastic/button adjusters on the sleeves and Velcro straps around the waist. And with adjustable CE-rated armor, you can get the right fit whether you are wearing layers or just need some additional room after stuffing yourself at the buffet. The pants have Velcro adjusters at the waist to ensure a tight fit as well as removable suspender straps.

Overall, this is a great set of riding gear whether you’re motorcycle adventure takes you to work and back or across the country. The Joe Rocket Dry Tech Nano is an affordable option to semi-custom touring suits of similar quality.

 

FirstGear TPG Apparel Road Test: There Will be Rain

February 22, 2010

Back in the fall, we had a chance to head out to Colorado with Tucker Rocky and FirstGear to check out the TPG lineup of apparel. This is pretty high-end stuff aimed at the hardcore adventure touring rider, the type of person who thinks nothing of clocking 50,000 miles a year on two-wheels, often in less-than-pristine conditions. I am not one of those people. However, I was up for a dual-sport ride through the Rockies with the chance of experiencing some weather and putting the TPG duds to the test. Well, we got weather. Rain. Sleet. Hail. All that stuff that’s mostly foreign to So Cal natives (me!). 

So, you’ve got to hand it to Tucker Rocky and FirstGear for picking a such a route and ride as a way to showcase the features of its TPG (Technical Performance Gear) apparel. They either had strong foresight into what we might encounter or had some major pull with certain parties to arrange that kind of weather.

Click here for the full story.

The Old Throw-Yourself-Downhill-Gear-Test: We Like It

January 20, 2010

Short of purposefully having a get-off on your motorcycle, what better way to test a new brand of riding gear than to throw yourself down a hill in (what looks like) the Silverlake area of Los Angeles? Arlene Battishill, the brains behind GoGo Gear and Scooter Girls, does in this little video she posted to YouTube.

 
I talked to her the day after she did this and she was still pretty shaken up by it, but I can’t help but find this endlessly entertaining. From what I’ve been able to surmise, Arlene is a pretty unique woman — who else is going to attempt to create a line of high-fashion riding gear for women from the ground up with no motorcycle industry experience whatsoever? So, if you ever get the good fortune of meeting her you’ll think, ‘Of course she threw herself down a hill to test that gear.’