Archive for the ‘dealernews’ Category

New bike = New thrills

June 1, 2011

Recently I found myself aboard a Ducati Multistrada 1200 S Touring, the über version of Duc’s über sport touring motorcycle.

There’s a very fortunate perk of my job, and the positions of many others working in the business, and that’s getting the privilege of riding a number of different motorcycles from a variety of OEMs. Quite simply it’s a motorcycle geek’s dream gig — even with the long hours of staring at words on a computer screen (that’s the writing geek’s dream job, a different story entirely).

This time around, thanks to Ducati’s PR dude extraordinaire, John Paolo Canton, I got about two-week’s seat time in the Multi, my first time on the do-all machine since its reincarnation as a superbike motor-powered touring bike.

The new Multi has more technical geekiness packed into than anything I’ve ever ridden. By comparison, my personal ride is a 2004 Triumph Thruxton: a carbureted motorcycle for goodness sake! Ride-by-wire throttle. Electronically adjusted front and rear suspension. Brakes that would stop the earth’s rotation. Ergonomics to die for. Four-mode engine mapping. Motorcycling by way of “Tron.”

When I picked up the bike from Tom Hicks’ Southern California Ducati in Brea, Calif., (home to Ducati’s press fleet) I didn’t know what I was expecting. I’d read about the four different engine modes but hadn’t given it much thought. Didn’t know I’d be giving it a lot of thought later. A brief run-through of features with a tech and away I went.

And that’s when I discovered something about the Multi 1200 S: That ride home made me feel like I was discovering motorcycling again.

Settling into the machine over the next many days, this feeling of newness grew more intense. Sport mode was way different than touring mode as was urban and enduro. Switching back and forth between the settings offered a new type of thrill each time. Just the feel of it. The upright and very comfortable seating on a bike that produces 150hp simply felt like a entirely different experience.
Freeway cruising (touring). Short trips to the store and around town (sport). Quick trips around the block (urban). Long rides through the twisties of Southern California’s San Gabriel Mountains (sport). Commutes to work and back (sport, OK, there’s a trend here). Each one a journey unto itself.
The bike’s been on the market for a while now, so I’m not the first person to ride it or write about it. I’m just one rider with an opinion which, when it comes down to it, that’s what we all are. One man’s hyperbole is another man’s yawn.

And with motorcycling, more than anything in life (save for your tastebuds or musical inclinations), riding is a singular event specific to one person at one particular moment in his or her life. That’s why each ride is an adventure. Why one bike that works for this guy might not work for that girl or the other dude.

In this case, riding the Ducati truly felt like learning anew the thrill of motorcycling. Alas, it soon was time to return the loaner and settle quite comfortably back onto my own Thruxton — like putting on an old, British, shoe.

This experience got me thinking about my current ride and my past motorcycles and scooters. How often do I take the time to rediscover the thing that’s in my garage? To make the changes and tweaks to make my next ride that much different? To make me feel like I’m rediscovering motorcycling? To be honest, not enough. It’s been a while since I uncorked the Thruxton’s motor, replaced mirrors, mounted a fairing or changed the suspension.

How often and in what ways do you help your customers rediscover their own machines? How often do you do the same with yours?

Dennis Johnson
Editor in Chief
dennis.johnson@dealernews.com

It’s about damn time

April 22, 2011

Harley-Davidson boasts the highest market share of women riders out of all the OEMs, according to Amanda Lee, the company’s PR manager in charge of Outreach audiences — women, young adults, African American, Hispanic and active military. This, of course, is no big surprise given Harley’s long history with women riding its motorcycles.

Of the 235,000 people trained through the company’s Rider’s Edge courses, 35 percent are women. Lee herself is a graduate of Rider’s Edge, as is Claudia Garber, Harley’s director of marketing and product planning.

The Motor Co. is reaching out to women riders with a host of events and marketing efforts. From the now-ubiquitous Garage Parties to this month’s Biker Bootcamp for Women (a full week in Milwaukee immersed in Harley culture), Harley-Davidson is taking an active and aggressive effort to connect with its female customers, existing and potential.

Harley’s idea is to seize upon the growing women rider demographic and help encourage, support and inform those who have taken or are taking the leap into what has traditionally been a male-dominated sport/pastime/industry.

“As more women get into the sport, it’s kind of a contagious thing,” Lee says. “As more women are riding and more women are seeing other women riding, more women are stepping up to the plate and saying, ‘I want to do that.’

“We’re simply throwing fuel on the fire, responding to a movement that’s happening in the industry,” she adds.

The “women riders movement” — not that it’s a formal title or anything — is a relatively new phenomenon. Yes, women have been riding motorcycles, ATVs, personal watercraft and snowmobiles forever, but not in any great number and not in a way that ever attracted much attention from the industry at large.

Even five years ago a female motorcyclist would have been hard-pressed to find riding gear that not only was cut to fit the female form, but was stylish to boot. Again, yes, there was riding apparel, but it wasn’t until Joe Rocket and Icon jumped into the mix that women’s gear looked like it had actually been designed by and for women.

These days, apparel manufacturers know they need a women’s line to even compete.

How about riding on the back? You’ve got to be kidding. Women are finally coming into their own in the powersports industry, and it’s about time. Is there room for improvement? Absolutely. But with more women moving into everything from dealership and OEM/aftermarket management to wins on the racetrack, it’s clear: This ain’t the same old boy’s club.

In honor of May’s Women Riders Month, Dealernews puts its focus on the women who help drive this industry, from the pioneers who pushed through gender barriers to those coming into a business that now welcomes them. Even our cover profile highlights Top 100 dealer Donna Coryell and her dealership, Deptford Honda Yamaha. Hers is an inspiring story.

Why is it important to recognize the women in our industry? Because it’s about damn time. Women are more than the “other half”; they bring new perspective and vitality to a business that — truth be told — could use some freshening up. The industry’s history has been drenched in testosterone, and it’s left things a bit, um, ripe.

Indeed, there are many, many women leading the charge at the dealership, in the media, in the aftermarket, at the OEM level and on the racecourse. We’re profiling just a few of them in this issue. Go to www.dealernews.com/women11 to see a running roster of notable femmes and their contribution to our industry. And if you’d like to nominate women for the list, drop us a line at editors@dealernews.com with their names and brief bios. We’d love to add them.

Dennis Johnson
Editor in Chief
dennis.johnson@dealernews.com

The next customer boom

April 1, 2011

At the time of this writing, oil prices were uncomfortably hovering a hair above $100 a barrel, and premium gas on the West Coast had settled in at about $4 a gallon.

The ongoing conflict in the Middle East (isn’t that redundant at this point?) assuredly means that these prices would likely go up before they’d go down, or so says the analysts.

In fact, federal energy officials say there’s a 25 percent chance those gas prices will average $4 a gallon or more throughout the summer driving season.

Smells a bit like 2008, the last time oil prices were this high. Another flashback moment? How about some of the news headlines starting to pop up across the Internet. This one could have been ripped straight from a 2008 newspaper: “As Gas Prices Rise, So Do Scooter Sales.”

If you’ll remember, scooter sales that year jumped 66 percent the first half of 2008 and eventually settled in at 41 percent higher than 2007. Many OEMs had to play catch-up to meet the demand of all the new two-wheeler commuters. It wasn’t uncommon to hear that dealers just plain sold out of certain models.

That was the year many first-time riders got a taste of two-wheels. Piaggio alone reported that its sales were up about 75 percent the first quarter of 2008. Former CEO Paolo Timoni would later report that many of these new riders had no interest in riding motorcycles, that they were fine on their Vespas and Piaggios.

Of course, with every boom there is a bust, and we all know what happened after the scooter market crashed. One could make a good guess that there’s a metric boatload of noncurrent scooters — from all OEMs, even the new Asian entries — sitting in storage waiting for gas prices to drive people back out of their cars and onto the seats of those waiting machines.

Well, it’s been a long strange two years since the oil and gas spike and attendant scooter rush, but here’s something to think about: If you were one of those dealers who catered to that huge bloom of new riders, what did you do to keep them coming back into your store? Did you convert them into regular customers or did they travel back out the door they came in, and back into their cars after gas prices dropped down to partially ridiculous levels?

So, if the analysts are correct and gas prices continue to inflict pain on most drivers at the pump, there’s a good chance many of those folks will make the switch to two wheels. And not just scooters. High gas prices could likely get people out on motorcycles as well. (It’s odd wishing for high gas prices, isn’t it?)

The question is, if sales do take a jump and more people start riding, are you prepared to service those new customers? What will you do — this time — to keep them coming back into your store? And how do you reach out to potential customers to let them know you’ve got something that can help ease their petrol pain?

It’s conventional wisdom that getting new customers through the front door is one of the most difficult tasks of running a business. Now, with gas prices giving them a little nudge, it’s your chance to welcome them into the powersports family.
Let us know if you were one of those dealers who converted those 2008 scooter riders into loyal customers. Also, drop us a line if you’re cooking up plans to win over the next group of new riders. Send your comments to editors@dealernews.com.

Dennis Johnson
Editor in Chief
dennis.johnson@dealernews.com

This story originally appeared in the Dealernews May 2011 issue.

Dealers, take a bow

March 1, 2011

Forget about winning — just entering the Top 100 Dealer competition is no easy feat. The application itself is arduous, requiring entrants to submit information about the vehicles and products they carry, the size of their store and all of its departments, and estimated gross revenue per square foot.

Entrants must submit their best examples of customer service and community involvement initiatives. They have to detail how they motivate their employees. They are required to submit a mission statement, and then detail how they fulfill that mission each and every day.

They have to describe their service departments, their accessories departments, their marketing departments and their
e-commerce and Web activities. Entrants submit images — lots of images — showing the best of their stores. They attach samples of print collateral, digital files of commercials, PDF documents of media campaigns.

Indeed, once you complete and submit a Top 100 entry, it stands to reason that you can use this same file as a basis for loan applications, city permits, employee handbooks, franchise petitions, and more.

So for all who submitted a Top 100 dealer entry for the 2011 competition, and many of you did (entries were up 56 percent this year), well done. The competition was the tightest in recent memory. And if the rest of the dealer community is doing half of what you all are doing each and every day — well, then, the powersports industry is going to be in good shape.

Two unique awards launched in the 2011 competition, both recognizing an effort related to the competition itself. The new Consumer’s Choice Award, sponsored by our sister property, the Progressive International Motorcycle Shows, is awarded to the Top 100 entrant that secured the most consumer votes in a balloting process conducted on www.motorcycleshows.com in November and December. The 2011 Consumer’s Choice Award is given to South Texas Suzuki, a Lytle, Texas, dealership that received 37,000 (no, that’s not a typo) votes in the competition. Congratulations to a dealership that knew how to rally its troops.

The second is the new Vehicle Brand of the Year award. We launched this award with a specific mission: to give the OEMs a real incentive to support their dealers who are working hard every day, and detailing their achievements through the Top 100 entry process. The Vehicle Brand of the Year award goes to the “winningest” OEM — that is, the franchise listed most often by the Top 100 dealers.

For 2011, the Vehicle Brand of the Year award goes to American Suzuki, an OEM that arguably has had better years in terms of vehicle rollouts and annual sales. But here’s one thing Suzuki does right: It works with its dealer community to really encourage those businesses to go through the Top 100 entry process. Suzuki recognizes that the entry process is an education in and of itself, and it is to be commended for its support of the Top 100 competition.

Congratulations to the class of 2011. You work hard, you stay focused, and you persevere. And for that, the industry is grateful.

Mary Slepicka
Group Content Director
mslepicka@dealernews.com

This story originally appeared in the Dealernews March 2011 issue.

Bika Chik fashion show at Dealer Expo

February 20, 2011

It’s kind of a well-known fact that men’s motorcycle apparel exponentially outnumbers women’s apparel  — the complete opposite of how it works in everyday casual wear, where women’s apparel dominates. But luckily for us ladies — and judging from what I’ve seen on the Dealer Expo show floor this weekend — there are some great women’s clothing companies out there holding down the fort. Designer Jeanette Keller’s Bika Chik is one example. A few minutes ago, I caught its fashion show at the Fashion Forward stage, and besides all those cozy graphic tees, there were two things that stood out to me as possible hot-sellers:

Embroidered leather vest. This looked even better on the model than it does in this stock photo. It’s fitted, and a tiny bit on the cropped side, which makes it great for riding. The front has all kinds of edgy zippers and a small upper pocket design, along with two front pockets and a button-waist. The back is embroidered and studded with Swarovski crystals. Comes in black, in sizes S to XL.

 

 

 

 

 

Leather jacket with fringe. A little bit of fringe never hurt anyone. Just like the vest, it has an embroidered skull design on the back to bring some edge to the girly design. It currently comes in pink, but I wonder if Bika Chik will offer this in black as well, in the future. Comes in sizes S to XL.

A bonus: Prices are pretty affordable, too.

If you’re at Dealer Expo, you can find Bika Chik Wear in Booth 5653. Otherwise, contact the company directly by visiting www.bikachik.com and clicking on the “contact us” button.

— Cynthia Furey

Dealers: How you can jump on the mobile-shopping bandwagon for free

February 18, 2011

Hey dealers:
I’ve got an assignment for you that may propel you headfirst into this year’s top marketing trend: mobile e-commerce. Why should you care? In this morning’s Learning Experience Marketing session with Craig Cervenka at Dealer Expo, it was said that an estimated 75 percent of people will try mobile shopping at least once this year. 75 percent. If that doesn’t reel you in, how about if I tell you that your assignment will take just 5 minutes, and it’s free.

Here’s what you do:

Make sure your business is listed in Google Places.

1. Visit places.google.com

2. In the bottom right corner, click on “Google Places for Business.”

3. Create a Google account or log in, if you already have an account.

4. You’ll be redirected to a page where you can “List Your Business.” Just follow the directions on the page. If Google doesn’t have the information on-hand, you’ll enter your address, website phone number, and some other pertinent information.

WHY THIS IS IMPORTANT: If a local customer Google’s your dealership name, or even a keyword like “motorcycle jacket,” you have a better chance of landing on Google’s front page for local results. There will be a map, your address, web address and phone number, all there for them to see. Also, Google automatically formats its Places pages for mobile screens (iPhone, Android, etc.), so you’ll get a nifty little mobile page as well.

— Cynthia

The Trench: Joe Rocket’s latest all-climate offering

February 1, 2011

Our man Steve Blakeney over at Sullivans Inc., just sent us the latest offering from Joe Rocket and upon first glance, it looks pretty cool (or warm).

The Joe Rocket Trench is a combo bit of kit that features a mesh, armored jacket surrounded by a trench coat-length waterproof outer layer. The inner jacket also sports a removable fleece vest. Oh, and there is a rain pant included that’s stored in a pocket on the outer layer. When combined together, the three pieces look like an all-climate riding solution.

Here’s some of the details from Sullivans:

Trench coat (outer layer) features:

  • 100 percent waterproof
  • Waterproof pockets
  • Reflective stripes and logos
  • Adjustable cuffs
  • Built-in straps that ca be used to secure jacket to legs
  • Built-in storage straps for rolling up and affixing jacket to motorcycle
  • Rain pan included and stored in integrated pocket.

Mesh jacket (inner layer) features:

  • Grade A C.E.-rated protectors in shoulders and elbows
  • Removable spine pad with pocket for optional C.E. spine protector
  • Removable warm fleece vest
  • Multi-point SureFit custom adjustment system
  • Internal face shield pocket
  • Snap Loops for attaching jacket to belt
  • Reflective stripes and logos
  • Available in sizes small through 3XL.
  • MSRP is $249.99

We are a giving bunch

February 1, 2011

Growing up in the South Bay area of Los Angeles, I lived across and down the street from a bar that was a hangout for a well-known motorcycle club.

It was the kind of place where a midnight brawl meant that my friends and I could go out the next morning and find billiard balls in the gutter opposite the bar. Cops kept close tabs on the joint, if I remember rightly, and it was always jumping on the weekends.

We mostly avoided the place, but as it is with things dark and dangerous, there always was a strong urge to poke around and maybe peek inside during the safety of daylight. Motorcycles. Bad dudes. Fighting. What boy wouldn’t want to check it out?

Once a year, on the marquee outside there was an incongruous message alongside the dates of Top Jimmy and the Rhythm Pigs’ next appearance. It read something like “annual toy drive” or some such, and it always seemed odd (to my juvenile mind) that a rough-and-tumble place like this would have anything to do with toys.

What I didn’t realize at the time was that the toy drive this motorcycle club held every year around Christmas was reflective of something quite common to the motorcycling world as a whole. Sure, the club existed on the fringe of the general two-wheeled brotherhood, but its members were doing the same thing many other riders were doing everywhere — giving and supporting their communities.

Motorcycles and other powersports activities attract a wide range of personalities, but there is one trait that seems to be almost universal, and that is, as a whole, we are a very giving bunch. Toy drives. Charity runs. Supporting veterans groups. Fund-raising events at dealerships. There are countless small events all over the country raising money for local organizations and groups. And then there are the biggies, the mega-events known far and wide — Oliver Shokouh’s Love Ride for the Muscular Dystrophy Association. The Ride for Kids events benefitting the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation.

In 2009 alone, the Ride for Kids activities nationwide raised $4.4 million for the nonprofit focused on finding the cause and cure for childhood brain tumors. Some of the top fund-raisers contributing to that amount were held by powersports dealers. Nielsen Enterprises in Lake Villa, Ill., landed the top business spot with a contribution of $126,857. Bob Henig, owner of Bob’s BMW in Jessup, Md., personally raised $59,012. Not a bad haul for either one.

When motorcyclists come together to give back to their surrounding communities, stuff gets done.
Take this month’s cover dealer, J&W Cycles, a Top 100 dealer for 20 years straight located in Washington, Mo. Owners (and brothers) Bob and Jimmy Jones not only serve on several local boards, they’re also behind a popular motocross race held each year and the local Town and Country Fair. Bob is also president of the chamber of commerce and Jimmy serves on the board at MMI, and the dealership supports several local charitable organizations.

The Jones brothers’ commitment to community even earned the dealership the Top 100 Best Community Involvement Initiative award in 2007. Reading over the list of activities and groups they support leaves one wondering how they have time to run a top-notch dealership, let alone get any sleep.

Examples of giving and charitable work can be found at all levels across the spectrum — from the bad-boy motorcycle clubs of my youth to the outpouring of local support offered by the Joneses, owners of a 34-year-old dealership.

So what’s the motivation? Hard to say or even guess, but it likely falls somewhere between laying the groundwork for good karma and pure altruism.

One thing for certain, the Jones brothers’ commitment to community has earned them and their dealership an esteemed spot in their local area and a loyal customer base, which is a pretty good payoff for simply doing good deeds.

Dennis Johnson
Editor in Chief
dennis.johnson@dealernews.com

This story originally appeared in the Dealernews February 2011 issue.

Joe Rocket Dry Tech Nano gear long-term test: A year of of all-weather riding

January 19, 2011

by Trevor Trumbo, former Advanstar group marketing director, Powersports and Veterinary divisions

It’s difficult to find good riding gear that you can live with day in and day out all year long. But this 2010 offering from Joe Rocket may be the only set of gear you need to buy. I’ve been wearing the Dry Tech Nano jacket and pants for more than a year, and I have put both pieces to the test. Consider this background on my riding:

A motorcycle is my only mode of transportation in California. I commute to work five days a week on my motorcycle. The total round trip distance is 54 miles. I take day/overnight trips around California every weekend on the motorcycle and consistently log 300-plus miles. Each week I ride between 500 and 800 miles.

The jacket and pants have held up to harsh commuting conditions consisting of highway riding at 70-plus mph through heat, cold, and rain. I’ve had other jackets and pants that show fraying edges after a few months of riding. The Joe Rocket set looks almost new (except for the dirt and grime, see pic below) and I can confidently report that the stitching and seams remain in excellent condition. Both jacket and pants have multiple highly reflective panels that do a great job of making sure you’re seen when riding at night or in low-light conditions.

The jacket and pants provide plenty of ventilation during the summer, when many riders either wear a mesh jacket or don’t wear a jacket at all. The Dry Tech Nano jacket flows enough air to keep you cool in all conditions, except 100-plus degrees and sitting still. I wear the jacket all 12 months of the year. When the weather begins to cool down, you can zip in the removable liner and be comfortable down to about 20 degrees (that’s the coldest temperature I’ve ridden in). Colder than that and you’ll want heated gear anyway. The pants feature a removable liner that you only need in the coldest of conditions.

I was most impressed with the ability of the jacket and pants to keep me warm and dry, even in torrential downpours. I can tell you that I don’t miss pulling over on the side of the road and trying to change into rain gear at the first sign of a storm and then having to change out again. The Joe Rocket gear lets me keep on riding without worrying about the weather. The pants feature full-length waterproof zippers up the legs making them easy to get into and out of. The Nano web material used, according to Joe Rocket, was originally developed as an air filtration system. No matter, it certainly works as advertised and is 100 percent waterproof and dries very quickly.

The jacket is adjustable for a variety of rider sizes with elastic/button adjusters on the sleeves and Velcro straps around the waist. And with adjustable CE-rated armor, you can get the right fit whether you are wearing layers or just need some additional room after stuffing yourself at the buffet. The pants have Velcro adjusters at the waist to ensure a tight fit as well as removable suspender straps.

Overall, this is a great set of riding gear whether you’re motorcycle adventure takes you to work and back or across the country. The Joe Rocket Dry Tech Nano is an affordable option to semi-custom touring suits of similar quality.

 

Winter thoughts

December 23, 2010

It’s nearly winter, and we’re huddling into our annual deep freeze — literally and metaphorically, depending in which section of the country you live.

There’s still some riding in the warm parts, and the cold parts host the hardcore and frosty, but the bulk of the two-wheeled populace has packed it in until the green starts poking through again. Bikes are parked for long-planned projects, rebuilds and makeovers, or merely parked until needed again, content to slowly gather dust and sit on quietly softening tires.

Riding gear is swapped out for snow gear, or at least a sensible winter jacket. Helmets are stowed. Inactivity spreads, slowing our metabolisms and dealership door swings. The end of the year is dark with short days and there’s something about the cold that brings a blue tinge to the sunlight as soon as it’s lost its long-cast autumn glow. Even at midday, it seems shadowy.

Yes, our yearly cycle is coming to a close, ready for rebirth in the new year. But even as hibernation beckons, there’s a little spark, a little flame of passion, around which we motor
cyclists and gearheads and powersports nuts can warm ourselves.

Here in the U.S. it’s the Progressive International Motorcycle Shows, and overseas it’s events like Intermot and EICMA in early fall. At the time of this writing, I’ve not been to any of the first shows on the schedule, but will definitely be there in Long Beach, Calif., when IMS comes to town from Dec. 17-19. I did, however, have the good fortune of attending the EICMA show in Milan, Italy, this year, thanks to the Italian Trade Commission, which organized the trip for a large international group of motojournalists and industry types.

If I’ve said it once, I’ve probably said it 25,000 times: I’m not prone to hyperbole, but there are likely a million different adjectives that could be used to describe the EICMA show. Humongous. Outrageous. Passionate. Unbelievable. Exhausting. Expansive. Breathtaking. Those are just a few, and they still don’t do justice to a show that covers an area of nearly 47 football fields, including 532,800 sq. ft. of booth space featuring more than 1,100 brands from 39 countries.
More than 500,000 visitors attended the show on the public days, and attendance numbers increased every day in comparison to the 2009 show. The visiting press numbered 2,104 registered media types.

Walking the length of the show — spread across six separate pavilions at the Fiera
Milano — is real exercise. Trying to do it on the days open only to press and trade visitors is akin to passing through a moving rugby game. The tension and excitement vibrating from the attendant press corps during the new model presentations is palpable. During Triumph’s introduction of its new Tiger 800s and the Daytona 675R, it was near impossible for the lethargic (me) or timid (others, not me) to get near enough to snap a pic until the crowds filtered away, on to the next event.

But the thing about EICMA that makes it so remarkable, something that transcends the sheer scope of the event or the brimming energy of the motopress, is the passion of those in attendance. It’s cliche to say that Europeans view two-wheels differently than Americans, but there’s no denying that Italians — and those who travel in from nearby EU countries — seem to breathe motorcycling.

During my tour of the show, I saw families and fathers and sons and groups of friends pointing at, posing next to, photographing, staring at, peering under, poking around, discussing in great volume, fantasizing about and generally loving the machines on display.

To paraphrase Ed Sullivan, it’s simply a really big show.

Crowds everywhere you turn. And oh what beautiful motorcycles — the new models and the old favorites — especially those we’ll never see on American shores. And riding gear. And parts and accessories that we’ll probably never see here either. It’s like a living version of the Sear’s Christmas Wish Book directly aimed at motorcyclists.

So as the end of a pretty ugly year comes to a close and I shuffle off to look for a few months of warmth, ready for a spring rebirth, I get to flick through my mental Rolodex of images from EICMA and those I’ll acquire in Long Beach. Each one falling like kindling into that little flame of passion that keeps things revving through the seasons and rough spots.

Dennis Johnson
Editor in Chief
dennis.johnson@dealernews.com