Archive for the ‘V-twin’ Category

Harley’s Iron 883 – Nightster’s Younger Bro

January 26, 2009

In its oh-so clever way, Harley-Davidson today sprung its newest variation on the Sportster theme — the Iron 883. Not one to follow the typical OEM format for releasing new models, H-D likes to quickly (and sometimes quietly) introduce its latest bikes. Take the soft launch of the XR1200 back in December (here, here and here).

So today in my inbox I find the announcement about the Iron 883. This is the latest edition to H-D’s Dark Custom lineup. It is basically a Nightster with Harley’s 883 Sporty motor in it and a price tag (MSRP $7,899) that reflects the smaller power plant (the Nightster carries a $9,899 sticker). It’s got most of the same all-black bits and the fork gaiters. An it uses the same trick turn-signal/brake light/tail light combo used on the Nightster as well as the same side-mounted license plate that folds back. (I’ve often wondered about the purpose of the folding plate and how it might work in going up against a red light camera. Not that I’d ever endorse doing something like that. I’m just saying.) Enough bloviating. Here’s some pics.

Personally, I’m a big fan of H-D’s Dark Customs. Not so much of the marketing campaign behind them, but the bikes themselves are pretty neat. Back when the Nightster was first launched I got a loaner for a few weeks and spent a lot of time blowing around town on that thing. It was a far cry from my AMF-era Ironhead Sporty, which sat more often than it ran, but looked really good sitting.

I really became fond of tearing around on that little hot rod Nightster. It handled and moved and scraped hard parts through just about any turn right or left. And, not that I cared much given it was a press bike, it got thumbs up and attaboys at every stop. Most people really dug the look of it, as did I. Maybe I’m forgetting, but I don’t recall having any real issues with it other than the anemic stock pipes it comes with, but that’s just an aftermarket call away from being fixed. Overall, it is a great bike for zipping around on. With that said, I’m going to see about getting an Iron 883 for review and I’ll let you know what effect (if any) the drop in power has on such a little runabout. And now for some more specs/info.

  • Rubber-mounted Evolution 883 cc V-Twin black powder-coated engine
  • Electronic Sequential Port Fuel Injection (ESPFI)
  • Black fuel tank with unique graphics
  • Black front forks with gaiters
  • Black belt guard and front fender supports
  • Black, 13-spoke cast aluminum wheels, 19-inch front / 16-inch rear
  • Black low rise drag style handlebar
  • Black mid-mount foot controls
  • Black low profile front fender
  • Black chopped rear fender with combination rear stop/tail/turn lights
  • Chrome staggered shorty exhaust with dual mufflers
  • Side-mounted license plate holder
  • One-piece, solo Sportster classic seat
  • 25.3-inch seat height
  • Optional Harley-Davidson Smart Security System
  • Classic 3.3-gallon fuel tank
  • 565 lbs. (wet)
  • 55 ft. lbs. @3,500 rpm
  • lean angle: right 29 degrees, left 30 degrees
  • 5 speed

Honda Shows Its Fury

January 16, 2009

Honda unveiled its long-awaited 2010 Fury cruiser today at the Cycle World International Motorcycle Show in New York.

The Fury is arguably the first modern Honda to offer a true custom look: long, low and simple. Powered by a 1312cc V-twin, the shaft-drive bike offers the longest wheelbase ever in a production Honda motorcycle, 71.24 inches; low 26.7-inch seat height; a hidden single-shock rear suspension offering a “hard tail” look; a fat 200-series rear tire and slim 21-inch front tire.

Check out a complete report at Dealernews.com
honda_2010_fury

‘Jesse James Is A Dead Man’

January 10, 2009

The crazy economy has put a dent in custom motorcycle sales and caused many builders to look for alternative money-making opportunities. For Jesse James, the guy arguably mostimages responsible for reviving the chopper craze, prospects appear endless. In May, he takes on the role of a modern-day daredevil in “Jesse James Is A Dead Man,” a new, original weekly series on Spike TV premiering on Sunday, May 31 (10:00 – 11:00 PM, ET/PT).

“Our goal was to create a new and distinctive series for Jesse that is unlike anything else on television,” said Sharon Levy, senior vice president of original series for Spike TV. “In this series, viewers will get to experience one of the most fearless guys on the planet in an entirely new way, taking on death-defying physical challenges each week.”

Ten weekly one-hour episodes of “Jesse James Is A Dead Man” are being produced for Spike TV. Each episode follows James as he readies himself for a different death-defying challenge he has always wanted to face and beat. Preparing for the risky challenge can often be as dangerous as the challenge itself as he endures a battery of tests to prepare. With CGI effects, viewers get a taste of the enormity of the stunt, revealing the physiological stress James’ body will endure.

Some of the dangerous challenges he’ll be facing include the grueling off-road race better known as the Baja 500, hitting over 200 mph on a Nitro bike supercharged by ultra-combustible nitro-methane fuel and braving harsh Artic weather conditions by riding a motorcycle in minus-60 degree temperature across the infamous Ice Highway that connects the small towns of Inuvik and Aklavik.

James first gained fame with his business West Coast Choppers. During the past nine years he launched his TV career with Discovery Channel’s “Motorcycle Mania”; produced and starred in the international television hit, “Monster Garage”; established his own production company, Payupsucker Productions; became publisher of Garage Magazine; and opened eco-friendly burger joint Cisco Burger in Long Beach, CA.