Archive for the ‘xr1200’ Category

Backflip on an XR1200? Let’s See This Done on a Road King.

December 7, 2009

Because we’ll never have video of me flipping anything but the bird, here’s a link to Australia’s Kain Saul backflipping an XR1200. Saul makes it so smooth and buttery looking, I may just try this in the backyard on my Thruxton. Now that I see this is out and about, there’s also news that American Chuck Carothers pulled off this same trick a day later in Prague. Really nice work.

Lane Splitting … Legal By Opinion

December 8, 2008

The Contra Costa Times in California features a Q&A column titled Queen of the Road. Today, questioned by a reader, “the Queen” delved into figuring out what is legal when lane splitting in California.

“In California, lane splitting is legal as long as it’s done safely,” Sgt. Trent Cross of the California Highway Patrol answered. “If the lane splitting was done in an unsafe manner in an officer’s opinion, based on his or her training and experience, he or she could issue a citation.”

Hmmm, an officer’s “opinion” … that’s a word that often proves pesky to anyone attempting to defend against a citation.

According to the CHP Web site: “Lane splitting by motorcycles is permissible but must be done in a safe and prudent manner.”

Again, who is to say what is safe and prudent?

The Queen also queried the Motorcycle Safety Foundation. Ray Ochs, director of training for the MSF, says the organization supports the practice if it is legal and can be done safely

“Do it when you have an escape area where you can swerve right or left if you need to,” Ochs told the Queen. “In higher-speed traffic it’s not appropriate, and it should be done at the speed at which traffic is traveling.”

It’s no wonder other states haven’t legalized the act of lane splitting. The rules on the books in California aren’t exactly definitive.

Nevertheless, chances are that this guy’s maneuvers aren’t legal in most urban environments:

Long Beach IMS — Motorcycles Galore

December 6, 2008

The Cycle World International Motorcycle Show is making it stop here in Long Beach this weekend and, as usual, the OEMs used this stop to show off its latest and greatest. Without further ado, here’s what we saw on Friday, the traditional media dog and pony show.

Ducati unveiled its Streetfighter for the first time before American audiences. In introducing the bike, Ducati media man John Paolo Canton says the Italian OEM jumped past some of the other OEs by posting sales that were up over last years. “We’re a good news story this year.”p1000395
Also unveiled the newest addition to the 16-year-old Monster family, the Monster 1100, and the 1198. Of the latter Canton says it looks a lot like its predecessor, but is in fact an entirely new bike under the hood. How does 170 hp and 97 ft. lbs. of torque sound? The Streetfighter will be available in June 2009 at an MSRP of $14,995.

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Anglada (left) is the man behind last year's LRG Hayabusa.

Kawasaki unveiled a new bike for stunter-man and 2Wheel Tuner editor, Jason Britton. Designed and built by Nick Anglada of Custom Sportbike Concepts, the 2008 ZX-14 is an anti-bling custom bike that you can actually ride, Britton says. “And, beat the crap out of it,” he adds. The bike features such goodies as an Ohlins suspension, Brembo brakes and a Gregg’s Customs single-sided swingarm. The signals are glassed in, as is half the headlights, so that they can only be seen when lit up.
BMW’s Roy Olliemuller unveiled the 1300S and the 1300GT, the newest iterations of Bimmer’s K-bikes, which were first introduced 25 years ago. The S sports 175 hp and 103 ft. lbs. of torque. These are BMWs? Also showed off an early production version of the S 1000 RR superbike, which it will campaign in the 2009 World Superbike Championships. This inline-four, 1000cc bike is expected to be a 2010 model year release. When it hits the market, expect somewhere around 190 hp in addition to traction control and ABS.

Honsetly, the S bike isn't that blurry in person.

Honsetly, the S bike isn't that blurry in person.

Nice.

Nice.

Now that's a gentlemanly bike.

Harley-Davidson. The Motor Co. took the Long Beach show to introduce the XR1200 to the waiting U.S. public. Because I can’t get enough of this bike, here’s another shot. It really is a fine machine. H-D also showed off a customized trike that was, quite honestly, the nicest trike I’ve ever seen. Did I just say that.

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The electric scooter people at Vectrix showed off the Vx-1, an all-electric, highway legal scooter. With an MSRP of $10,495, the Vx-1 reaches top speeds of 62 mph and offers acceleration from 0 to 50 mph in 6.8 seconds. You gotta love electric motors. It has an average range of 30-55 miles on a single charge, all of which is dependent on twisty your wrist is. The scooter can be plugged into either a 110v or 220v outlet. Vectrix reports that it saw 321 percent distribution growth in 2008 and expanded from 38 dealers to 160 dealers, mostly in the second half of the year. Sales grew 156 percent for year.

Anglada and E-Boz.

Yamaha showed off a custom V-Max conceived by Jeff Palhegyi. Over at its sportbike area, Yamaha unveiled a Bostrom Brothers custom R6 designed by Nick Anglada and built by Custom Sportbikes Concept. The build was part of the Boz Bros. tour organized by our sister publication, 2Wheel Tuner.

Kymco unveiled its Yager GT200, a 176cc fuel-injected scoot that will retail for $3,149. Also introduced was the Quannon, a 150cc entry-levelp10004811 motorcycle. You don’t know how excited I am that there are more entry-level bikes on the market. Nothing like seeing a beginner rider cruising off on a liter bike.

Suzuki used the IMS stop to show off two custom Burgman 400s. The first, dubbed “The Pimpster” was designed and build by chopper guys Todd’s Cycle. The other is the Sport Scooter concept, a Burgman 400 sporting the paint job of a GSX-R, with a Gixxer 600 muffler, B-King handlebars and wave-style rotors to name a few bits. If you’ve ever seen what the folks in Japan do to scooters, you’ll know that these two styling exercises were tame in comparison. What, no neon lighting?

The Pimpster. More metal flake than a fleet of 1970s speed boats.

The Pimpster. More metal flake than a fleet of 1970s speed boats.

Would you buy this?

Would you buy this?

More on the XR1200

December 1, 2008

We’re returned from the most gluttonous days of autumn to an inbox filled with Spam and a couple interesting bits from the motorcycle world. It’s been about a week since word got out that Harley-Davidson was finally releasing the superbad XR1200 to an American audience. (See our original story here and blog post here). It was a super soft launch that definitely got the internet buzzing ahead of any official announcement. Very clever H-D.

One more look.

One more look.

Now the official word is out of Milwaukee in the form of a press release that includes some extra tidbits of information. Here’s a few excerpts:

“Drawing significant styling influences from the successful Harley-Davidson XR-750 motorcycles that set new standards for dirt track racing success over the last 30 years, the XR1200 features technical innovation to provide potent street performance and handling. In fact, Harley-Davidson dirt track racing legends Scott Parker and Rich King participated in the XR1200 development.

The Motor Co. also forwarded some specs if you’re interested in that sort of thing (of course you are).

Isolation-mounted XL Evolution 1200 cc V-Twin engine with silver powdercoat finish
Downdraft Electronic Sequential Port Fuel Injection (ESPFI)
Electronically controlled active intake system
Precision oil-cooled cylinder heads
90 peak hp @ 7000 rpm (per SAE J607)
68 ft. lbs. peak torque @ 3700 rpm (per SAE J607)
High performance designed tubular mild steel frame and cast aluminum swingarm
Black three-spoke lightweight cast aluminum wheels, 18-inch front / 17-inch rear
Specifically developed Dunlop Qualifier D209 tires
Wide black dirt track handlebar
Styling and graphics inspired by the legendary Harley-Davidson XR-750 dirt track racer
Upswept, high-volume brushed stainless steel 2-1-2 straight shot exhaust system with satin chrome finish
Nissin dual front brakes with four-piston calipers and 292 mm patented uniform expansion rotors
Sport-tuned Showa suspension with 43 mm inverted front forks and pre-load adjustable twin rear shock absorbers
Rearset foot pegs for additional cornering clearance
29.2-inch seat height with standard passenger pillion and foot pegs
Optional Harley-Davidson Smart Security System
Aircraft style aluminum alloy fuel filler
Unique compact instruments with white-faced tachometer, digital speedometer, dual trip meter and clock
3.5-gallon fuel tank

Spy photos??

November 24, 2008

The news from Milwaukee about the XR1200 reminds me of a posting over at the Biltwell Inc. blog back on July 5. Seems the Biltwell guys were cruising the byways of Corona, Calif., when they saw this guy blasting through traffic.

My only question is: Who do they think they’re fooling with that black tape?

Whoops. Looks like I made those pics a bit small. I’ll resize and repost.

Harley’s XR1200 — Here at last!

November 24, 2008

OK, does anybody have a spare $12k hanging around? If only they were still giving out loans like Halloween candy because the Motor Co. has officially (if very quietly) announced that it is offering the XR1200 to the U.S. market.

Sweet.

Sweet.

H-D’s media man, Paul James, confirms that dealers are taking pre-orders for the limited run of 750 units on a first-come, first-serve basis. The early window closes when all 750 are gone, or by Dec. 15, 2008, whichever comes first.

Early buyers get to choose from orange and black or … orange and black. It looks like two additional colors will be available after the Dec. 15 date. They are Vivid Black and Denim Pewter. MSRP runs from $10,799 to $11,179 with we lucky folks in Cali 100 bucks more a pop.

But honestly if I had, and this is a big if, the scratch I’d be down at the dealership this afternoon.