Posts Tagged ‘Ducati’

Second EICMA-China Show Set for July 2011

November 4, 2010

Seen as an exchange of commerce at the global level

MILAN (Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2010)— The second annual EICMA-China motorcycle show has been scheduled for July 2-4,2011, at the China National Convention Center in Beijing, show organizers said here today.

Plans for the show were announced at a press conference conducted by the event’s planners: CIME (China Italy Motorcycle Exhibition), a joint venture of EICMA, the China Chamber of Commerce for Motorcycles (CCCMA) and the Genertec International Advertising & Exhibition Company.

This year’s show was held last July in Beijing and drew 130 exhibitors and about 45,000 attendees. More than 200 exhibitors are expected to participate in next year’s show, said CCCM’s Bingnan Chen.

(more…)

Advertisements

Opening Day at EICMA’s Motorcycle Show

November 3, 2010

Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi with the director of EICMA Costantino Ruggiero during opening day ceremonies. It's a memorable show for Ruggiero, who is retiring this year after 25 years as executive director of ANCMA, the Italian motorcycle and bicycle trade association, and head of the group's EICMA show.

Huge show venue covers area of nearly 47 football fields

MILAN — It’s been seven years since I walked this world’s largest motorcycle show,but it seems as though I was never gone.

While much has changed at EICMA, much is the same— the almost overwhelming size, the jammed press conference schedule on the first two days (Tuesday and Wednesday have 21 press conferences) devoted to trade and press representatives. The doors open to the general public on Thursday. By the time this 68th edition of EICMA wraps up on Sunday, Nov. 7, close to 500,000 people will have walked these aisles.

The highlight of the first day, for Italians certainly if not for foreign visitors, was the opening ceremony featuring Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi.

Security seemed especially tight for Berlusconi’s visit this year and made it almost impossible to move through the presentation area in the main administration building that houses EICMA offices and the media room where we do a lot of our work. The media center is set up with computer facilities, and it hosts the drop off area where exhibitors distribute information to the media.

Unlike in past sessions when Italy’s top politicians opened the show with comments related to motorcycles, often discussing transportation issues and plans for boosting Italy’s important motorcycle and bicycle industries, Berlusconi used Tuesday’s event as an opportunity to poke barbs at his political opponents and to talk about general political issues. Recycling,  garbage issues in Naples and proposed wire tap legislation didn’t hold much interest for international guests looking for news about motorcycles.

(more…)

Italian Motorcycle/ATV Show Opens in China

June 10, 2010

Friday is Kick-Off Day in Beijing, China, for an innovative new international motorcycle and ATV show and conference driven by—hold on here— the Italian motorcycle industry. “EICMA China—The Motorcycle Show,” runs Friday through Sunday, June 13,2010. It’s the first ever show for EICMA outside of Italy. EICMA is best known for putting on the the world’s largest motorcycle show every November in Milano, Italy, when several hundred thousand consumers and trade representatives walk the floors looking at the latest machines and accessories.

The trade fair and conference being held at the National Agricultural Exhibition Centre of Beijing is an alliance of EICMA and two major Chinese partners: the Chinese Chamber of Commerce for Motorcycle (CCCM) and Genertec Advertising& Exhibition Co.Ltd. The goals of the event are to show foreign products to the Chinese market and to bring together representatives of several countries to discuss powersports issues relating to motorcycles and ATVs.

On the motorcycle side, the 6.5 hour China International Motorcycle Industry Summit will focus on emissions and on building the Chinese market for motorcycles. A motorcycle ban was instituted in Beijing in 1985 and expanded has been expanded to more than 170 cities in China. It’s estimated that the ban reduced sales by 4 million units annually.

(more…)

MotoVentures: A Day in the Dirt Photo Page

April 7, 2010

Not too long ago, I was invited out to Gary LaPlante’s MotoVentures compound for a day of off-road riding with the crew from Southern California Motorcycles. The excursion was a Christmas gift from owner Tom Hicks to the staff at his Triumph, Ducati, Victory and Polaris dealership.  (READ THE STORY HERE!)

It was fantastic day tearing up the trails at the 300-acre facility near Anza, Ca. — right up until I started crashing … over and over again. I got tired from the first two times hauling the WR450 out of a creek bed and a sand wash and it was all downhill (figuratively) from there. And, the So Cal Motorcycles crew looked like they had a blast. Coming off the bleak stink of dismal cycle sales in 2009, it was probably a nice little energy boost. 

One of the employees, service writer Trevor Dyck, brought along his film camera and shot some really nice analog pics of the day. I forgot how much I like the graininess and realistic feel of photos shot on film. Here’s a bunch of them from the trip. If you get a chance, check out Trevor’s other photos on his website http://trevordyck.com.

 

MotoVentures' Gary LaPlante — trials style. photo by Trevor Dyck

 

photo by Trevor Dyck

 

photo by Trevor Dyck

photo by Trevor Dyck

2010 Multistrada 1200 Fever — Ducati Austin

March 25, 2010

These days you can’t swing a dead cat without hitting one story or another about the 2010 Ducati Multistrada 1200 and we here at Dealernewsblog don’t want to be left out of the loop. After all, who doesn’t want to get hit by a dead cat?

Our pal Robert Pandya passed along some cool videos of Ducati North America’s Jeff Brooks giving a tech talk about the new bike to a group of committed Ducatisti at Ducati Austin. According to Pandya, close to 50 hardcore Multistradisti (is that a word?) lined up on a Sunday morning to get the low downistsi on the amazing tech and specs of this cool new ride-isti. (Remember 150hp!) Let’s just end the stupidity here and move onto the videos. Thank’s Robert!

Ducati Austin 2010 Multistrada tech talk Pt1

Ducati Austin 2010 Multistrada tech talk Pt2

Cycle World IMS New York: Meat the Press

January 22, 2010

While pretty much all the press attention during the Cycle World International Motorcycle Show stops is directed toward the motorcycles, it’s kinda cool to turn that focus around to the journalists themselves.

If you’ve never been a part of this roving crowd of camera snappers and flashers (CAMERA flashers) it’s often been described as a scrum al a rugby, and for good reason. As the media schedule skips from OEM announcement to OEM annoucement, the press follows in a tight bunch, each jockying for position and camera angles. It’s even crazier at the European shows (like EICMA) where it seems that a fist fight is only a shove or elbow away. This roving band of moto-journos tends to break up as the hours progressive until it’s the niche guys getting the niche news. Good times for sure.

At the opening of the New York IMS stop, show representative and extremely debonair motoguy, Robert Pandya, was directing the first few hours of the press event. At 9:30 a.m. Friday morning, the show floor was still chockablock with unopened wooden crates, union workers, cleaners, assemblers and other assorted workers. Forklifts whirred and honked their way through the crowds, impatiently navigating the crowds to deliver payloads of whatnot.

There were reps from blogs, magazines, radio shows and newspapers, a span of media representation ranging from Roadbike to All About Bikes magazine, from Popular Science to American Iron. Oh year, don’t forget the Motorcycle Radio Network and Rider. In other words, the show gets some pretty damn good press from a wide range of media. We like this.

“Move in here folks,” Pandya says while trying to start the show at the Cycle World booth. “We don’t want to play journalist shish-kabob.”

From here the group moves en masse to BMW to hear head media-man Roy Olliemuller tout the OEM’s 2009 sales numbers before introducing the BMW crew and the S1000RR. There were those forklifts again in the background (and almost in the foreground!)

Boom, off to Victory Motorcycles. Then the Suzuki Busa Beats 2010 launch. Next, Star and the Performance Machine Raider. Honda? You’re up. Harley-Davidson’s got a new bike. Let’s go see it. A Ducati fashion show AND the 2010 Multistrada 1200? Bellisimo! Hardcore Choppers. TapouT. Ducati freestyle stunt team. Phew. It’s a busy schedule.

Ducati Unveils Multistrada 1200 at Long Beach International Motorcycle Show

December 4, 2009

Taking a page from the European motorcycle show scene, Ducati opened the official unveiling of its Multistrada 1200 Friday afternoon with a lineup of prancing models and pulsing electronica — and it was good.

 

Yes, the Multistrada 1200 is somewhere in there.

 

 

The scene? A throng of media types standing by with cameras ready. Cue the music. Strike the umbrella girl poses. Leather short shorts. Tight spandex. Blasting disco, and then, Michael Lock, CEO of Ducati North America.

“OK, now you get me for a couple of minutes,” says Lock as he took the stage. “You might have heard that there is a recession out there, but not at this booth.”

Before pulling the curtain off the new adventure touring bike that was first shown to crowds at the EICMA show in Milan, Italy last month, Lock took some time to explain why the OEM was coming out with a sport touring bike given the small size of the market segment and the company’s history with such models.

Lock explained that with the aging motorcycle market, the company is targeting at the newer riders coming into the scene and the Multistrada 1200, basically an adventure touring bike version of a Ducati superbike, is aimed squarely at them. Conceptually, the idea behind the bike was to take the company’s engineering prowess on the track and apply it to a bike that is a fairly standard setup.

“We’ve really thrown everything we know at this bike,” Lock says right before returning the stage to the prancing models and pounding disco.

Erpelding, Europe’s Keeper of Classic Race Bikes

September 29, 2009

Are you a racebike enthusiast? Happen to be planning a trip to the Nuerburgring in Germany?

erpeldingIf so, you may want to visit former motorcycle and auto dealer and racer Frithjor Erpelding, a man who claims to have the second largest private museum in Europe dedicated to race motorcycles. Located in the Eifel mountain hamlet of Jammelshofen, near the ‘Ring, the museum houses 200-some bikes and a half-dozen of his championship-winning race cars.

Among the units on display: AJS, Aprilia, Ariel, Bimota, BSA, CZ, Egli, Gilera, NSU, Koenig, Moto Parilla, Moto Guzzi, MV Agusta, Matchless, Maico, Triumph, Norton, Greeves, Jawa, Puch, Wanderer, Harris, BSS, Benelli, Laverda, Royal-Enfield, Harley-Davidson, Horex, Honda, Gilera, Kawasaki, Kreidler, Linto, Suzuki, Scott, Seley, Yamaha, Rickman, KTM, Ducati, Montessa, NSU, Vincent, Velocette and Zuendapp, etc.

I asked Erpelding which of the 200 units is his favorite. “The Norton,” he replied without pause. Erpelding has two Norton Manx. “The chairman of Cambridge University recently contacted me, asking if I would sell one of my Manx. I told him ‘No’. He offered Euro 100,000 and I declined. Then he offered Euro 200,000 and I again declined. Finally, I cut to the chase and told him I wouldn’t be selling the bike no matter what the price.”

MuseumBut, Erpelding is willing to sell certain units. He says he recently sold a Vincent to a collector in the United States for Euro 80,000. “He deposited the check in my bank account before even receiving the bike. I called and asked him why he trusted me, and he said, ‘I’ve heard you’re a trustworthy guy’.”

Erpelding is a fella who loves telling his stories. If you’re planning a visit, be sure to leave time to have beer at his Race Museum Bar. He’ll tell you about his run-ins with racer Agostini and Yamaha bosses; his thoughts on Triumph, MZ and KTM; his trips to Goodwood; and his days of racing Honda motorcycles and cars.

Check out Erpelding’s website, which features the full line-up of the museum’s bikes on display.

Race Replica Scoots We’re Not Getting

September 27, 2009

File this under cool stuff we’re not getting in the U.S.: Three 50cc scooters wrapped in race livery that are sure to be a hit with sportbike enthusiasts looking for alternative surface street transportation.

Inspired by Valentino Rossi and the Fiat Yamaha MotoGP racing team, the Aerox Team Yamaha Race Replica (top), powered by a liquid-cooled two-stroke 50cc engine, is wrapped in the new-for-2009 paint and graphics to match the racing livery of the YZR-M1 MotoGP bike.

The Gilera Runner Marco Simoncelli Replica (middle) is powered by a 50cc liquid-cooled two-stroke engine delivering 5.4hp and features livery similar to that of the 250cc MotoGP World Champion’s factory racebike.

The Malaguti Phantom F12R Ducati Corse Superbike (bottom), available in 50cc liquid or air-cooled two-stroke versions, is the latest in a line of scoots made available via a licensing agreement between Ducati and Malaguti. Also available: the Phantom F12R Bayliss Limited Edition and the Phantom F12R Ducati Team version.

I saw all three of these units during a recent trip to the Nuerburgring in Germany. The bikes depicted in the photos were for sale at motorcycle dealerships adjacent to the world-famous racetrack.
Yamaha_ScooterGilera_ScooterDucati_Adenau-copy

My House Wine: CorsaVino

June 30, 2009

A couple of months ago I reported on CorsaVino – a wine brand of limited availability launched by Arun Sharma, the general manager of MotoCorsa in Portland.

t4Well, today I received my shipment of Sharma’s 2005 Cabernet Sauvignon Il Mostro Rosso, limited to a production of 98 cases and retailing for $314 by the case or $29 by the bottle; and 2005 Syrah, limited to a production of 217 cases and retailing for $292 by the case or $27 by the bottle.

Mmmm, now to deal with the most difficult decision. After all, being a wine enthusiast is a bit like being a collector of motorcycles: Do you drink/ride the product or do you not drink/ride the product?