Posts Tagged ‘kid’s ATVs’

Second Co-Founder Departs Baja Motorsports

May 16, 2009

Ryan Daugherty Resigns From Leading Chinese Distributor

Handled Sales & Marketing, Product Development, Sourcing

Ryan Daugherty, one of the co-founders of Baja Motorsports, has resigned the company and is looking for other opportunities, he told me. Daugherty, Rich Godfrey and Jennifer Andrew launched Baja in 2004 and built it into a leading distributor of Chinese powersports products—including kid’s ATVs and dirt bikes— in the U.S. and Canada. Last year, Baja sold an estimated $70 million worth of products at wholesale. Its leading customers include Pep Boys, Fleet Farm and Canadian Tire.

Ryan Daugherty

Ryan Daugherty

“It’s just time for a change,” Daugherty told me. “I’ve enjoyed helping build Baja to its current strong position in the market, but I’m going to step back now for a bit and look at the powersports industry. It’s changing and I know there will be other opportunities down the road.”

Daugherty says he doesn’t have any deadline in mind for taking on a new position.

I tried to get in touch with Rich Godfrey a couple of times to see what changes he’s likely to make now that his partner is gone, but I haven’t hear from him yet. I’ll let you know what he has to say when we hook up.

Daugherty, 43, has been vice president for sales and marketing at Baja. His duties include developing new products, sourcing those products in China and marketing the products to dealers and consumers. One of his big efforts has been developing training and service materials for technicians and customers.

He also wrote Baja’s ATV Action Plan recently presented to the CPSC (Consumer Product Safety Commission); Baja is one of only two importers of Chinese products that has had its Action Plan approve by the CPSC. An approved Action Plan is required before a foreign manufacturer can sell ATVs in the U.S. under provisions contained in the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008.

With Daugherty’s departure, Godfrey remains the sole co-founder of Baja still with the company. Andrew sold her shares in 2007 and left the company when Techtronics Industries, Inc., (TTI) acquired a majority share of Baja. Daugherty sold his equity position to TTI almost two years ago.

TTI is a $3.2 billion manufacturer who’s stock is traded on the Hong Kong Exchange. It manufactures private label household goods for leading brands, and it also owns several internationally known brands, including Hoover, Dirt Devil, Milwaukee, Homelite and Ryobi. JD

Contact me with news tips and story ideas
at 952/893-6876 or joe@powersportsupdate.com.

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Latest CPSC Action Simply Is Not The Answer

May 5, 2009

Two-Year Stay of Enforcement Doesn’t Solve Problem

Congress Should Fix Poorly-Written CPSIA Law


joedelmont

Joe Delmont

The CPSC’s recent promise not to enforce for two years a legal ban on the sale of kid’s ATVs, dirt bikes and snowmobiles and related parts, garments and accessories just doesn’t cut it. I’m sorry, but the move is woefully inadequate.

The vote Friday by commissioners Nancy Nord and Thomas Moore is simply the latest step in this silly dance between Congress and the Consumer Product Safety Commission. The awkward two-step is called the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) that was passed last year.

The dreadful legislative effort bans the sale of toys designed for children ages 12 younger that fail to meet several safety standards. The lead limit is 600 parts per million in parts that are accessible to children. The ban became effective Feb. 10, 2009.

Congress says the law gives the CPSC authority to grant exclusions where appropriate— in the case of brake cables, for example. The CPSC responds by calling the law poorly written, and says it is unenforceable.

Retailers and manufacturers from many industries are caught in the middle.

Today, the situation is in a shambles. Some powersports manufacturers are selling products that have been modified or reclassified for youngsters aged (more…)

CPSC Issues Enforcement Stay

May 4, 2009

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) said today that its two commissioners had voted May 1, 2009, to hold off enforcing the lead content provision of certain components in kid’s ATV, dirt bikes and snowmobiles for two years. The provisions were part of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) passed last year. The ban on machines for youths 12 and younger became effective Feb. 10, 2009.

This means that the CPSC won’t enforce the ban on the sale of these machines and related parts, garments and accessories, although it’s unclear exactly what impact this action might have for powersports dealers who have not been selling the banned machines or for manufacturers that have stopped producing and selling kid’s machines. The ban still could be enforced by state attorneys general and other local officials.

Many dealers are selling kid’s machines that have been modified to meet the standard or that have been reclassified as being designed for kids aged 12 and older.

Look for more information on this site later today. JD

Contact me with news tips and story ideas
at 952/893-6876 or joe@powersportsupdate.com.

Grassroots Efforts Aim at CPSC, Congress

February 17, 2009

Websites Send Thousands of Emails to Congress
MIC/SVIA CPSC Letter Campaign Generates Strong Response

The recent letter writing campaign pushed by trade groups to change the ban on kid’s ATVs and dirt bikes  found a ready group of exhibitors and attendees at last weekend’s huge Dealer Expo, the motorcycle industry’s annual B2B equipment show in Indianapolis.

And a website launched by a Missouri state representative has generated tens of thousands of emails to congress in only a few days.

Officials at the Motorcycle Industry Council (MIC), a trade group located in Irvine, Calif., collected nearly 4,400 signed letters at the Dealer Expo last weekend in support of exclusions under the law for the powersports industry by the end of the four-day show Monday afternoon.  MIC representatives plan to deliver these letters to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) this week and send copies to Congressional leaders to urge their support for MIC/SVIA’s request for exclusions. The SVIA (Specialty Vehicle Institute of America) is a trade group representing manufacturers of off-road equipment.

(more…)

CPSC Approves Sale of Units for Youths, 12-15

February 17, 2009

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) said Saturday it has heard the concerns of the motorcycle and ATV industries and riders and is taking action to meet their needs.

The agency is charged with implementing the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) that was signed by President Bush last August. The law limits the amounts of lead in paint and materials contained in products designed primarily for youth age 12 and under.

Effective Feb. 10, 2009, any products for children that did not meet the requirements specified in the law could not be sold. These items include ATVs, dirt bikes, apparel, and related parts and accessories for these items.

Now, the agency has decided that machines designated for youths 12-15, formerly the Y12 category, are not prohibited under the CPSIA and can be sold, an agency representative told Dealernews magazine.

(more…)

CPSC Blocks MIC Lead Content Petition

February 17, 2009

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has denied the motorcycle industry’s request for temporary relief from the lead content rule covering children’s toys that became effective Feb. 10, 2009, saying it didn’t have authority to grant that relief.

The petitions filed by the Motorcycle Industry Council (MIC) and the Specialty Vehicle Institute of America (SVIA) sought temporary exclusions that would have provided an opportunity for powersports companies to clear out inventories that do not meet the new standards.  The CPSC now will consider the MIC/SVIA submissions as it finalizes its rule-making for granting permanent exclusions (more…)